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Since 1993, Center for Social Change has been providing support services to people with developmental disabilities. We invite you to be a partner with our mission and vision to serve millions of children and adults with a wide range of disabilities around the world.

Mission

Our Mission is to provide services of the highest quality for people with cognitive and developmental disabilities and related disorders including autism that optimize each individual’s independence and capabilities, ensure self-determination and rights and, with partnerships in the community, enhances their opportunities to live healthy, safe and valued lives.

Vision

Our Vision is to provide programs and services to individuals with developmental disabilities and related disorders including autism to live and work in the community and exercise their rights, choice and freedom and to live independent of institutional life through integrated efforts of change agents who are passionate about changing lives of people with disabilities throughout the world.

Center for Social Change is a private nonprofit organization that supports children and adults with special needs including autism spectrum disorder. The Center is a strong advocate for personal choices in community living for individuals who are developmentally, physically, psychologically and emotionally challenged. The Center is a board-driven organization and has a 501(c)3 status under the IRS code. Since 1993, it has been providing various services including residential, vocational, supported employment, medical adult day, therapeutic integration for children with autism, volunteering opportunities and advocacy to individuals with intellectual disabilities.

CSC has the sensitivity and the skills needed to serve the individuals with multiple disabilities. The first individuals that CSC supported residentially in the community came from Rosewood Center, Maryland’s largest State institution. Because these individuals lived in the State institution for 30 to 40 years, their lives in the community presented us with challenges. However, they were successfully integrated into the community. Today, they continue to enjoy their lives in settings where they make choices about menus, activities, the decor of their homes, and staffs who support them. Vacations, picnics, bowling, movies, shopping at malls are choices that have become routine for these individuals. Where they are not capable of exercising their choice, surrogate decision-makers assist them in the task.

Over the years since 1993, CSC expanded its services to more individuals with challenging behaviors, medically fragile and autistic in many counties of Maryland.

Success

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Brian Smith

"When my husband and I were contemplating transitioning Brian from the Rosewood Center in Baltimore about 25 years ago, we didn't really know much about the options that were avaialble to us.”

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Michael Dellangelo

"For many parents, the decision to move their adullt child with a developmental disability from their home to the care of another is a difficult one. For some who made such decisions long ago, it is often difficult for them to remember what went into the decision making.”

Edwin Burtwell

"Before taking up residence with Center for Social Change nearly 18 years ago, Edwin B. had lived with both of his sisters. But, Edwin’s behaviors, which led to frequent hospitalizations, had made this difficult for all involved. After one hospitalization, staff at the hospital recommended Center for Social Change as a place that might be able to provide the stability and security under which Edwin could thrive.”

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Janet Novak

"Janet N’s mother remembers the changes that took place in their lives after Janet became sick. When it was clear to her mom that she wouldn’t be able to handle caring for Janet at home after one of Janet’s hospitalizations, the hospital staff who assisted her suggested that she contact Center for Social Change.”

Frederick Zengal

"Rick Z. came to Center for Social Change nearly twelve years ago in a way that is not so typical. Rick had been receiving supports for another provider agency in Carroll County...”

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